photographer / writer / traveller


If we are passionate about people, we will be passionate about their world. Christians often feed the hungry and shelter the homeless. This Christ-like concern should widen to include the environmental conditions that affect food production and the well-being of our planet-home. In many places, people lack food and shelter because forests have been destroyed or the water supply has disappeared. These ecological issues cannot be solved simply by relief efforts. They require careful, informed, sustained creation care.

Howard Synder & Joel Scandrett, Salvation Means Creation Healed: The Ecology of Sin and Grace: Overcoming the Divorce between Earth and Heaven

Sep 19    + 6

The frame does not simply exhibit reality, but actively participates in a strategy of containment, selectively producing and enforcing what will count as reality. It tries to do this, and its efforts are a powerful wager. Although framing cannot always contain what it seeks to make visible or readable, it remains structured by the aim of instrumentalizing certain versions of reality. This means that the frame is always throwing something away, always keeping something out, always de-realizing and de-legitimating alternative versions of reality, discarded negatives of the official version. And so, when the frame jettisons certain versions of war, it is busily making a rubbish heap whose animated debris provides the potential resources for resistance. When versions of reality are excluded or jettisoned to a domain of unreality, then specters are produced that haunt the ratified version of reality, animated and de-ratifying traces. In this sense frame seeks to institute an interdiction on mourning: there is no destruction, and there is no loss. Even as the frames are actively engaged in redoubling the destruction of war, they are only polishing the surface of a melancholia whose rage must be contained, and often cannot. Although the frame initiates (as part of weaponry) or finishes off (as part of reporting) a whole set of murderous deeds, and seeks to subordinate the visual field to the take of war waging, its success depends upon successful conscription of the public. Our responsibility to resist war depends in part on how well we resist that daily effort at conscription.

Judith Butler, on photography in Frames of War

Sep 19

Regarding The Torture Of Others — Susan Sontag

Sep 19

Sontag remarks: “let the atrocious images haunt us.” …Her imperative suggests that there are conditions in which we can refuse to be haunted, or where haunting cannot reach us. If we are not haunted, there is no loss, there has been no life that was lost. But if we are shaken or “haunted” by a photograph, it is because the photograph acts on us in part through outliving the life it documents; it establishes in advance the time in which that loss will be acknowledged as a loss. So the photograph is linked through its “tense” to the grievability of a life, anticipating and performing that grievability. In this way, we can be haunted in advance by the suffering or deaths of others.

Judith Butler, Frames of War: When Is Life Grievable?

Sep 17    + 1

A Berbecian breakfast.  (at Boulted Bread)

A Berbecian breakfast. (at Boulted Bread)

Sep 17    + 5

at Boulted Bread

at Boulted Bread

Sep 17    + 2

Sep 17    + 1

…violence in the name of civilization reveals its own barbarism, even as it “justifies” its own violence by presuming the barbaric subhumanity of the other against whom that violence is waged.

Judith Butler, Frames of War: When Is Life Grievable? 

Sep 16    + 3

The date function of the camera may specify precisely when the event happened, but the indefinite circulability of the image allows the event to continue to happen and, indeed, thanks to these images, the event has not stopped happening.

Judith Butler, on “Torture and the Ethics of Photography” in Frames of War: When Is Life Grievable? 

Sep 16    + 3

<3

<3

Sep 15    + 18

s.t.